A Comprehensive Naturopathic Guide for Complete Digestive Wellness

Tag Archives: lifestyle

IMG_2166It is our hope that our readers have benefitted from the New Year, 3-month, Plan for Wellness. Here are seven painless and simple at-home acupuncture steps you can do to maintain good health and vitality. I recommend acupuncture and we had a wonderful guest blog post a few months ago that a lot of our readers thanked us for.

My naturopath also has me on a total “detox” regimen that includes castor oil packs, meditation (I use Rodney Yee’s “AM Yoga” DVD, or try Jon Kabat-Zinn’s wonderful collection of relaxation CDs), skin “sloughing” before shower (which entails roughing up your skin with a loofah sponge from your extremities toward your heart and encourages new cell growth), drinking plenty of water, regular exercise and daily yoga, counseling with a social worker or psychotherapist, weekly (free) REIKI and monthly massage visits, acupuncture sessions monthly, and physical therapy with integrative manual therapy-healing. A good attitude also helps. I regularly repeat to myself positive messages like:

“Don’t let this disease rule your life and get you down, but when you need to, ‘Ask for Help!’”

This simple YouTube mindfulness video by Jon Kabat-Zinn is wonderful, and Dr. Kabat-Zinn was one of the first to bring mindfulness into medicine!

The suggestions I receive from my naturopath are an attempt to enhance my body’s natural elimination processes through the digestive system, kidneys, skin, liver, and lungs. All are essential to help me optimize elimination with minimal aggravation while also undergoing specific treatment suggestions with my gastroenterologist. I have found this support team and naturopathic/acupuncture treatment to be extremely effective as an aid that can dramatically lessen the physical effects of inflammatory bowel disease.

These seven relaxation techniques are really easy to do at home. I do them before my shower daily! Foot massages are also very beneficial, which I do before bed with some moisturizer (I add a bit of organic apricot or sesame oil to the Pure Essentials moisturizer to thicken it up, and I also put cotton socks over my feet if calluses are bad), as well as candle-lit hot baths with lavender oil drops in the water.

  1. Brush your gums and tongue. Spend at least 5 minutes each time you brush (longer is even better). Set a timer because 5 minutes may seem like a very long time at first. The acupuncture points along the gums match with the entire body system, as does the tongue.
  2. Brush your scalp. Remember when moms insisted that we always brush our hair for 50 strokes? Turns out, there are hundreds of acupuncture points on the scalp itself. For a quick session, massage the governing vessel 20. This point is located at the very top of the head, the point of 100 meeting points, which enables you to access several channels at once. Spend time massaging your scalp with your fingernails and even while you shampoo.
  3. Push back your cuticles on your fingers and toes. Just the act of pushing back your cuticles stimulates acupuncture points that go directly to every muscle and tendon in the body, bringing on relaxation. Need to keep a small child quiet at an event? This works like a charm. Plus you can trace every finger front and back as well.
  4. Loofah your body. This is a hard sponge that softens with use. Loofah plants can be grown, and are much softer than those found at most department stores. (Note: when purchasing a loofah, be sure it says ‘loofah’ on the package.) Use the loofah wherever there is skin. There are thousands of acupuncture points all over the body. If you find a sore or itchy spot, spend extra time there. It is likely that it is an acupuncture point that needs stimulation. Electricity is accumulating there and stimulation via massaging or using a loofah disperses this accumulation. Before showering, use the loofah sponge to aggressively rub from the extremities toward the head, beginning with the arms, then working up from the feet. After you rub all the dead cells off your body, an invigorating shower further energizes you and allows for the stimulation of new cell growth.
  5. Moisten your nasal membranes. When you splash water on your face, keep water on your little fingers. Put your little fingers inside your nose and moisten all around. You do not need to sniff water up into your sinuses. Moistening your nasal membranes increases your chi (your body’s bio-electrical energy).
  6. Breathing exercises. Most of us are chest breathers, rather than abdominal breathers, so we tend to breathe shallow most of the day. On inspiration (breathing in), push your stomach out as far as you can. On expiration (breathing out), let your stomach fall back to neutral. This is very difficult to do at first without thinking about it. When you breathe with your abdomen it forces the diaphragm to drop and thus increases your lung capacity. This is why singers practice breathing so that they are able to sustain notes much longer. Breathing leads to more oxygen, more chi and more energy.
  7. Massage your face, hands, feet, and ears. You can do this yourself, but it is more relaxing and fun if done by someone else. These areas also treat the entire body individually.

(Grateful to Patricia S. Wesley, D.C. for her support

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Daily massage and stimulation will increase blood flow, help improve the effectiveness of your current therapies, improve mood, decrease inflammation, and promote healing.

Remember to think positive, and here is a wonderful quote and photo from the XIV Dalai Lama.

We like to hear from our readers, and thanks for helping spread the word about our book and recommendations!

—Dede, a Crohn’s disease/ulcerative colitis patient perspective—post surgical removal of ileum, large segment of Sigmoid colon, and fistula/granuloma mass—symptom-free for the past eight years, but still a Crohnie/uc-er by definition…

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When you read Dede’s latest medical assessment (in the photo), you will see that she has no symptoms…and then read down, and see the symptoms/possible side effects from the medication!

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That was May, 2013. In her checkup this past October, the doctors said they are amazed at her condition and attribute it to her and Jessica Black, ND’s low-inflammation diet and lifestyle! They told her that no medication is needed at this time, but only if symptoms occur.

The diet, the exercise, the yoga/meditation, and working with her naturopathic physician as well are all doing their job!!!

High-potency turmeric (curcumin phytosome), a prescribed probiotic powder (Dede buys all her supplements from her naturopath’s office… Expensive, but worth it for the best quality), ultra potent C, Omega 3 fish oil, Phyto-multi vitamins, magnesium with calcium, D3 liquid drops, and a daily adrenal assist (herbal) pill provides key nutrients and botanicals to support adrenal response to stress and support the ability to adapt to stressors and restore balance.

As we move into the wonderful month of February, with longer days and a holiday/school vacations, now is the time to think about training for a walk or a run (Team Challenge, or a CCFA.org walk—http://www.ccfa.org/get-involved/team-challenge.html). Set a goal… Also, add a visit to a naturopathic physician, and try acupuncture (with a trained practitioner who is recommended… If you are nervous about needles, ask for Moxa).

These anti-inflammatory diet and lifestyle changes are a big part of your wellness campaign. Take it one day at a time. Get out in nature (and snow) every day! And continue to heal, and restore balance in your life…

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Good day to my fellow Crohnnie’s and UC-ers,

Holidays are fun—remember that!!! In the spirit of our favorite holiday when you have IBD, we are gearing up for a gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free, AND grain-free Thanksgiving!!! Yahoo! Can’t wait. Here is what we can eat: TURKEY!!! The best comfort food on earth (with lots of tryptophan in it that makes us feel good), sweet potatoes (yams) that are steamed and mashed with olive oil and a bit of melted canola butter on top, small sweet onions with canola butter, steamed carrots, cranberry sauce (unsweetened), as long as you can tolerate cranberries. Don’t try ANY new food over any holiday. If you go to a potluck, don’t eat, or bring your own food …. Remember to stay positive, get a lot of rest and exercise every day to clear your head. Start meditation, and volunteer at a local Thanksgiving Day dinner (I’ll be making some gluten-free dishes to bring to my town’s open dinner as a donation)….

Take care of yourself! Give back to others, and you will have a perfect holiday!

Here are some more of Dede’s “Living-with-Crohn’s & Colitis” TIPS—

Probiotic & Diet
For PROBIOTICS, look for a pure brand with a 50/50 blend of bifidobacterium and lactobacillus acidophilus. Perhaps you can find this brand: Metagenics, Ultra Flora “Synergy.” Take once a day, with or without food (depends on how you tolerate it). Keep that food journal, and note down any stress in your life, daily exercise, everything you eat. Don’t eat fried or spicy food—keep track, and eat small frequent meals. I have a really OCD technique: breakfast begins with tea and a dash of milk (the ONLY dairy I eat, and my ONE treat ;)), then add a bit of honey (again, buy in bulk and a pure brand). Cold cereal of almond milk mixed with bananas and cut-up melon (add nuts and raisins IF you can tolerate). Snack is peanut butter on carrots.
CHEW EVERYTHING really well!
Drink TONS of water with fresh lemon squeezed into it.
Drink TONS of herbal teas…I like peppermint

Lunch is tuna or chicken salad (use pure fresh, virgin, olive oil!), maybe chick pea humus and a handful of almonds on the side; snack is applesauce and peanut butter. Dinner is a grilled local beef/organic hamburger with steamed zucchini. No grain, no sugar, no dairy. I eat ALL the time and feel great on this diet. I don’t even crave sugar!

Good luck and stay positive. YOU CAN DO THIS!

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Having a Flare-Up
When I was first diagnosed with Crohn’s disease-ulcerative colitis, I remember what a frantic time it was for me. I had three jobs (typical when you live in a rural area) in order to make ends meet. My daughter was applying to college (stressful, to say the least), my father was battling bladder cancer, and I was teaching at a local college where none of the ‘real’ faculty knew my name.

I remember it was April, 2006, and when Emma went off with the college tour, I was too sick to even walk! I had to put the seat back in my car and just lie there.

It is easy to feel sorry for oneself during a flare, that’s for sure!

Don’t you just sometimes feel alone, and like throwing in the towel? Do you ever feel embarrassed that you might have an accident — like when you are walking around a college campus with a bunch of high school seniors and their eager parents?

The obvious answers are all yes: we are only human after all, and sometimes a change in seasons can stir up some allergies, a stressful work period can add fatigue and emotional turmoil to your life. It’s okay, though!

I decided just recently, in the midst of a painful flare, that I am not going to let this disease beat me down—I have too many things I want to do in my life! Take Carrie Johnson, the woman’s rowing champion who has Crohn’s–she is pursuing her dream. What about Pearl Jam’s Mike McCready,’or football great, Dave Garrard? They are living with chronic disease, and not letting it run their lives! Me, I’m just an ordinary girl, but I work hard and I’m taking this latest flare day by day…

It wasn’t fun last Wednesday night to be awake most of the night, cramping, feverish, disoriented, feeling the horrible blockage within, knowing I could be headed towards surgery again—feeling incredibly sorry for myself! I stayed in the rest of the week, gradually introducing safe foods back into my diet…

We need to pace ourselves, and admit that a cure isn’t imminent; we need to share our stories and not feel so alone; we need to listen to our bodies, and slow down when they tell us to. Sometimes, though, life is unpredictable and we have to forge ahead…accepting the good and the bad, while maintaining a good attitude and being proactive in our self-care as patients.

I sold a book last week, for my job as a literary agent—it is called “Wonder Woman Isn’t Bulletproof,”‘by the indomitable Shannon Galpin—she is out in the world, trying to make it a better and safer place for women and girls in Afghanistan. Perhaps my flare-up had something to do with my high stress level (bringing a book to auction!), but I wouldn’t change the joy of telling this amazing woman we had a book deal for anything! You can read why I’m so excited here.

Happy Spring—we still have snow where I live

So, it’s back to reality: lots of rest, fluids, I made a naturopathic doctor’s appointment for next week, scheduled a massage (have to budget carefully!), cooked healthy “post-flare-up” foods (rice, broth, soft-boiled eggs, gluten/wheat-free toast, peppermint tea) and ate small amounts while chewing thoroughly, slept almost 20 hours….healing, and feeling better already!

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Jessica Black, ND, my co-author, naturopathic doctor, mother of two, avid outdoors woman, and cookbook author of The Anti-Inflammation Diet & Recipe Book, was the reason my own story, and our book, Living With Crohn’s & Colitis, got published. By reading Jessie’s book that I purchased one day at my naturopath’s office, she inspired me to eat better, and thereby lower my body’s overall level of inflammation. . . . I contacted her about how great her book was, and we decided on the phone to write a book together. The rest, as they say, is….well a book that is helping tons of people because it is good science and a patient perspective. Fast forward to today. . . .

~

Update
After my colonoscopy results last week, I crawled into a little shell and barely communicated with friends, and family….I was also exhausted from the fasting and quite sore from all the probing and poking around in my small intestine! I called my insurance company, CBA-BC/BS VT, and found that the Mayo Clinic was “in network,” and they registered me as a patient. I can go there for a second opinion, probably in January when my sister can join me. Everyone was “so nice.” When I said those words on the voicemail of the surprisingly helpful insurance business rep, I burst into tears — ah, delayed grief!

Fast forward to yesterday
With a better attitude, more energy, and (by the way) no symptoms of Crohn’s (which are, when severe like my case: diarrhea, vomiting, cramping, skin ulcerations, joint pain, etc.), I followed up on my weekend consult with my co-author and nationally-recognized naturopath, Jessica Black (who, by the way, dropped everything on a Saturday to make a phone-house call for me!), with a visit to my local naturopath, the wonderful Cheryl Procter. Additionally, I made an appointment with my clinic gastroenterologist, Steven Bensen, to follow up on my colonoscopy results. I see him January 23rd, and I firmly believe in following both paths, down the middle if you will pardon my overuse of the metaphor, with allopathic medicine and naturopathic medicine, on either side.

My Naturopathic Treatment Plan
Here is what I am on now: Low Dose Naltrexone, High Potency Turmeric, Glutamine, probiotics, Vitamin D, Vitamin C with Echinacea, along with my multi-vitamin, adrenal support, and Omega 3. I am researching LDN like crazy, and found this study with positive results . . .

“Think Positive”
Since my diet is very low-inflammation (thanks to Jessica Black, ND!), I am really being careful now (after 6+ years of remission, I was definitely slacking!): No sugar, red meat, fried or fatty foods, etc.

Below, is a recipe for a delicious cornbread from my friend, Julie Robinson at the Brattelboro Food Cood (thanks doll!)… Note, I substituted 2 Tablespoons Honey for the sugar, and Rice Milk for the milk, and Tofutti Sour Cream for regular sour cream…. YUM!  Here is a great NYT link to gluten-free dishes, too! ~

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