A Comprehensive Naturopathic Guide for Complete Digestive Wellness

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Switching to a diet high in Omega-3s has been a major factor in my being in remission!

When I was first diagnosed with Crohn’s and colitis, I did not exactly jump into the fray of changing my diet and lifestyle… It took a few years! When you set out to try to change habits that are ingrained and also are associated with comfort (mother’s mac ‘n cheese anyone?), it takes time.

Wild-caught salmon follows the seasonal run of the Pacific Northwest. Photo courtesy of Central Mkt.

Wild-caught salmon follows the seasonal run of the Pacific Northwest. Photo courtesy of Central Mkt.

Now that I am on the other side of my twenty-year Crohn’s/colitis saga, I am in a place where I want to help others find their  own way.

Once thing I have learned through my dietary study, is the fact that we need Omega-3 fatty acids in our diet daily—and not just if you are a Crohnie or uc-er. Every day.

I eat wild-caught salmon at least once a week, take flax seed ground up to aid in digestion and add fiber to my diet. I also take an Omega-3 supplement daily that really helps my arthritic joints (due to Crohn’s). I am healthy, fit and the doctors are surprised and how well I am, relying on diet, supplements and a holistic lifestyle.

Someone like me would normally be on autoimmune suppression drugs, but I do not want to do that to my body, and my choice was a wise one as I am incredibly healthy!

Omega-3 fatty acids are found also in walnuts, which I also eat every day. Other sources are the ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) Omega-3 fatty acids found in certain vegetable oils like soybeans, canola and flaxseed, as well as in green vegetables (kale, and more kale!, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and leafy greens). The other type of Omega-3 fatty acid is called EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), and is present in salmon especially, as well as other types of fatty fish: Bluefish, mackerel, herring, tuna, anchovies and sardines are also excellent sources of omega-3s.

According to Dr. Frank Sacks, Professor of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, you should have at least one serving of Omega-3 fatty acids in your diet daily.

 

In my upcoming cookbook, Living With Crohn’s & Colitis Cookbook: A Practical Guide to Creating Your Personal Diet Plan to Wellness (with an Introduction by Jessica Black, ND, and a Foreword by Sarah Choueiry, Crohn’s patient and founder of The Crohn’s Journey Foundation) due out in September (!), I have a few salmon recipes, and I’d like to share one now (quick and easy and great for summer dining—remember, if one of the foods, like apples, is a trigger food and hard to digest, substitute it or delete it from the recipe and adjust the mayo and seasonings accordingly)…. Enjoy!

Easy Salmon Salad

Ingredients:

2 cans wild boneless, skinless salmon

½ cup mayonnaise, organic

½ cup minced carrots

½ cup minced apples

¼ cup sweet relish, organic and sweetened naturally

Directions:

Mix all ingredients in a large bowl. Serve chilled with crackers, on a salad, or alone.

Source: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/omega-3/

 

….and I also want add a checklist for how to shop for the best salmon and how to cook and store the fish, as follows:

Wild-caught salmon (in photo) follows the seasonal run of the Pacific Northwest, and we strive to be first to market. According to the folks at Central Market, you should only buy from markets that buy fish from strictly regulated fisheries committed to sustainable practices and the guidelines set forth by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). The fish has been out of the water less than 48 hours prior to its arrival, flown in fresh several times a week and each piece is inspected.

Here are some tips from them to best enjoy your wild-caught salmon:

  • Eat or freeze within 24 hours. Keep it in the refrigerator covered tightly in plastic wrap until you’re ready to cook it.
  • Don’t rinse with water or the color will leach.
  • If grilling, preheat grill to medium-high and grease it well with olive or grapeseed oil. Place the salmon on the grill, meat side down, and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, depending on thickness of the fillet. Flip over and cook 3 to 4 minutes more, skin side down. Also try it with a cedar plank. Sear with meat side down, then place skin side down on cedar plank and close the grill to infuse that cedar-smoked flavor.
  • If using a cast-iron skillet, heat it until almost smoking and sear 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Pull it off the heat and let it continue to cook in the skillet until desired doneness.
  • Salmon is done when it starts to flake, and it tastes best with a medium center.

 

Now that you know how to store and prep your salmon—enjoy! You can also pre-order my cookbook right here at your local, independent bookstore, and Sarah Choueiry and I are really excited to introduce you to a ton of great and easy recipes!

 

Happy Almost Summer!

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I found this photo this morning, when I was remembering how scared I was going in for surgery for a bowel resection due to a serious, three-week, blockage of my small intestine from complications of Crohn’s disease.

I only weighed 117 pounds in this photo, taken with my son’s college roommate, Justin, two days before my operation in 2006. I was so skinny and malnourished, it’s hard to believe now that I am over twenty pounds heavier! I also found my husband’s post on my CaringBridge site (which still exists under “DedeCummings”), and I want to tell all my readers and followers of this blog, that you should never give up hope!

Written May 22, 2006 8:35pm

Hi all–
The news from Hanover is very good: Dede was in surgery from about 9:30-noon, and awoke (in a manner of speaking) about an hour later. She had a good grip on the button of her morphine pump, and smiled beatifically every time she heard its answering “beep.”

Dr. Henriques took out approx. 5 inches of her small intestine, of which 5 cm had severe scarring and the rest was worn out, and about the same length of large intestine, which had been scarred by a fistula (an “abnormal passage” connecting the two, resulting from her disease/scarring). The doctor held up his index fingers like a fisherman describing his catch when describing all of this.

He also took out her appendix while he was in there, so we’ll have no access to supplementary information about her internal organs in the future. (Sorry: lame book joke…) Her gall bladder looks fine, just for the record.

He expects her to be in the hospital for only a few days, so she could get home as soon as Thursday. She has already gotten out of bed, taken a few steps, and sat up for a while.

By tomorrow she’ll be treated to smoothies and milkshakes, and can eat some solid food by the end of the week–Dr. Henriques predicts that she’ll be voracious by that point.

Thanks for all of your lovely notes and positive thoughts; I’ll be able to get my computer online in her room tomorrow, so keep ’em coming.

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Good day to my fellow Crohnnie’s and UC-ers,

Holidays are fun—remember that!!! In the spirit of our favorite holiday when you have IBD, we are gearing up for a gluten-free, dairy-free, sugar-free, AND grain-free Thanksgiving!!! Yahoo! Can’t wait. Here is what we can eat: TURKEY!!! The best comfort food on earth (with lots of tryptophan in it that makes us feel good), sweet potatoes (yams) that are steamed and mashed with olive oil and a bit of melted canola butter on top, small sweet onions with canola butter, steamed carrots, cranberry sauce (unsweetened), as long as you can tolerate cranberries. Don’t try ANY new food over any holiday. If you go to a potluck, don’t eat, or bring your own food …. Remember to stay positive, get a lot of rest and exercise every day to clear your head. Start meditation, and volunteer at a local Thanksgiving Day dinner (I’ll be making some gluten-free dishes to bring to my town’s open dinner as a donation)….

Take care of yourself! Give back to others, and you will have a perfect holiday!

Here are some more of Dede’s “Living-with-Crohn’s & Colitis” TIPS—

Probiotic & Diet
For PROBIOTICS, look for a pure brand with a 50/50 blend of bifidobacterium and lactobacillus acidophilus. Perhaps you can find this brand: Metagenics, Ultra Flora “Synergy.” Take once a day, with or without food (depends on how you tolerate it). Keep that food journal, and note down any stress in your life, daily exercise, everything you eat. Don’t eat fried or spicy food—keep track, and eat small frequent meals. I have a really OCD technique: breakfast begins with tea and a dash of milk (the ONLY dairy I eat, and my ONE treat ;)), then add a bit of honey (again, buy in bulk and a pure brand). Cold cereal of almond milk mixed with bananas and cut-up melon (add nuts and raisins IF you can tolerate). Snack is peanut butter on carrots.
CHEW EVERYTHING really well!
Drink TONS of water with fresh lemon squeezed into it.
Drink TONS of herbal teas…I like peppermint

Lunch is tuna or chicken salad (use pure fresh, virgin, olive oil!), maybe chick pea humus and a handful of almonds on the side; snack is applesauce and peanut butter. Dinner is a grilled local beef/organic hamburger with steamed zucchini. No grain, no sugar, no dairy. I eat ALL the time and feel great on this diet. I don’t even crave sugar!

Good luck and stay positive. YOU CAN DO THIS!

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RX, Flare—Where to begin…. Here are some lifestyle tips, from Dede, who has been in remission from Crohns for almost eight years…. Do not despair.

“There is a saying in Tibetan, ‘Tragedy should be utilized as a source of strength.’
No matter what sort of difficulties, how painful experience is, if we lose our hope, that’s our real disaster.”
—The Dalai Lama

  • Start with your daily food journal.
    Take control: hydrate, sleep, exercise, yoga meditation, daily…
    Walk 1-4 miles per day
    Sleep at least 8 hours per night (take powdered magnesium bicarbonate—Dede likes “Natural Vitality’s Natural CALM in the Raspberry-Lemon flavor, drink fresh-squeezed lemon-lime-flavored water all day long (carry glass water bottle with you, and the new ones are encased in non-breakable plastic or rubber)
    Drink herbal teas—Chamomile, dandelion root, peppermint— and also Green Tea that has caffeine, but also comes in decaf.
  • Movement & Meditation

  • Exercise rule of thumb, keep it short, but keep at it…after my bowel resection, I would walk a few hundred yards each day, and gradually increased to my daily 4 miles—get out first thing in the morning after a cup of tea — try to climb some hills to get your heart rate up.
    Start a gentle yoga DvD (Rodney Yee’s a.m. Yoga is wonderful), and set up a “yoga studio” in your house or apartment somewhere (mine is in the basement with an old TV, but I have made it my own with a little table and a small wooden Buddha, candles—it is peaceful and my own space).
    This yoga will lead to guided meditation. Even 5-10 minutes a day improves patient outcomes! A local class or “sangha,” is a nice way to learn to meditate.
  • Watch Your Diet

  • Test for allergens (in our book), and find out if dairy or wheat cause bloating or diarrhea along with other foods.
    Once you get in tune with your body, you can start to really tell if certain foods make you begin to flare and you can back off immediately and note in your journal to keep track.
    Keep a list of safe foods, foods to avoid.
  • Body Care—It Pays to Be Beautiful!

  • Before a shower, take a dry Loofa sponge and brush your skin all over, moving from extremities toward your heart, then take a relaxing shower.
    Use essential oils to sniff daily. I like lavender oil in my bath, eucalyptus oil in the shower
    Massage your feet every night before you go to bed. Use a nice moisture lotion (with lavender, if you like it), and I add organic apricot or sesame oil to make it thicker.
    Take some “Natural Calm” magnesium powder each night in a hot glass of water before you go to bed… You will sleep better!
    Massage the back of your neck—press with acupressure in the “still point” at the base of your skull—get a friend, or spouse, to help.
    Speaking of….ASK FOR HELP! Don’t do what I did, which was to lie in bed and retreat from the world for days at a time…the only trip to the bathroom for a journey…. Ask for help—on Facebook, or pick up the phone.
    See a therapist, once a month, or join a group for IBD, Crohn’s, colitis, or autoimmune disease.
    Volunteer at a soup kitchen or homeless shelter, or environmental action group…. Altruistic behavior helps you to let go of stress.
  • Last, but not least, LAUGH every day! Watch the stupid pet videos… Or this goofy video my friend, Dodie, sent me this morning… She is going through cancer treatment, and she is very brave and a wonderful friend, who retains a sense of humor!
    ~~~~~~~
    ;))


    Happy Spring! Time for “a second opinion”
    for this Crohnie patient….

    20130106-081800.jpgOh, not to worry . . . well, kind of. In November, I was told my Crohn’s had spread alarmingly. Another 20cm along my ileum (end of small intestine), from the previous surgery’s incision.

    The Dartmouth GI team, headed by one of the top IBD doctor’s in the country, Corey Siegel, MD, wants me to take two heavy-hitter drug combos—an immuno-modulator approach that I don’t feel comfortable with taking. Here is my (layperson, granted!) reasoning: since my quality of life is so good, and my symptoms are episodic and stress-induced, mainly (the docs don’t really like talking about stress as a disease-trigger, as it is so hard to quantify I think), my gut is telling me to wait and continue with my naturopathic treatment; and, quite frankly, I almost prefer surgery to the idea of taking such life-affecting medications…

    I want to add, that many of my Crohnie and uc-er friends are successfully being treated on these drugs, I have nothing AGAINST the drugs, and if they help and the symptoms are minimal, that is fantastic! Since many of you have asked (!), here is what they want me to take…. Not one, but TWO drugs, given the severity of my disease….. Read on:

    According to WebMD, Remicade (or infliximab) is used to treat certain types of arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, arthritis of the spine, psoriatic arthritis), certain bowel diseases (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis), and a certain severe skin disease (chronic plaque psoriasis). In these conditions, the body’s defense system (immune system) attacks healthy tissues. Infliximab works by blocking the actions of a certain natural substance (tumor necrosis factor alpha) in the body. This helps to decrease swelling (inflammation) and weaken your immune system, thereby slowing or stopping the damage from the disease. Remicade is given by infusions, through the vein (it usually takes 2 hours) every 6-8 weeks.

    The other drug they want me to take is commonly called 6MP. It is taken In pill form. This medication is used with other drugs to treat a certain type of cancer (acute lymphocytic leukemia). Mercaptopurine belongs to a class of drugs known as purine antagonists. It works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells. This drug may also be used to treat Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    In patients using infliximab along with azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine for the treatment of Crohn’s disease, there have been rare reports of an extremely rare, often fatal cancer (hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma).

    Sounds pretty scary, huh?

    Infliximab works by binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha. TNF-α is a chemical messenger (cytokine) and a key part of the autoimmune reaction. Cytokines are proteins that are produced by cells. Cytokines interact with cells of the immune system in order to regulate the body’s response to disease and infection. Cytokines also mediate normal cellular processes in the body.

    In our book, Jessica Black, ND, my co-author, discusses the cellular balance in the body to achieve and maintain a balance of homeostasis. In patients with IBD, the need for hormone balance and regulation is also important. In our book, she says,

    “Every organ in the body depends on, and influences, other organs—everything is interconnected in the body. This is why whole body approaches to healing often work better than treating just one system, or one symptom.”

    This naturopathic approach to whole body, and more holistic/lifestyle, healing is what I aspire to. Since I do not want to take the aforementioned drugs, and my overall health is so good, I feel better able to exlore other options. Emeran Mayer, MD, who wrote the Preface to our “Living With Crohn’s & Colitis” book, recommends a second opinion. (Here is the link LWC_Pages_EmeranMayer to his inspiring write-up.)

    I am leaving for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota next Sunday, and I will be there for almost a week. It will be interesting, to say the least (!), to hear what the GI team has to say about my case. i will be seen there at 8:00 a.m. on Monday, April 29th by William Tremaine, MD.

    Let the adventure begin. I am not scared, or alarmed—just looking for a more integrative approach to my personal patient care. My gluten-free, sugar-free, diet has been going really well—I feel healthier overall, and my research shows that sugar can create problems in the gut, and may even be linked to leaky gut syndrome, so it has been a great practice to switch to only using honey for sweetener. Here is a great video by Mark Hyman, MD, about why “functional medicine is different than conventional medicine” … it is VERY inspiring, not to mention PRACTICAL!

    A group of supportive friends and family . . .

    One thing I have going for me, and encourage my IBD-friends to be part of, is the online community of Crohnie and uc-ers that I am privileged to know and appreciate. Sometimes we make each other laugh! Take my Crohnie-friend, Christina . . .she is an awesome survivor of many surgeries and health problems, but when I read her interview with Sarah Chouiery of The Crohn’s Journey Foundation, I laughed out loud at the “embarrassing moments” section! Christina’s blog is a great resource for some welcome humor! I will have it on my iPad as I travel to Minnesota next week….

    This photo, below, was taken in my hometown of Brattleboro, Vermont…. Is it a real dog behind the statue of the Buddha you may ask?

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