What is cool, is when the patient starts to take control! That is something that leads to better health, in my experience. One site I go to frequently, via RSS feed, is my friend, Adam’s, called IHAVEUC. Adam just published his own book, and I recommend that, too. He has a great way of making you feel not so alone! Also, there is a new video on his site about his book, and his own story. A recent post from a business school student, 24 years old, really caught my attention: He is trying to take control of his life and integrate alternative therapeutic healing modalities into his gastro-clinic care. Here is the link to ihaveuc.com. Enjoy and don’t be shy!

Ah, the lovely leaves of toxidodendron radicans, or poison ivy.

So, this “patient-taking-control” idea, has me thinking:

I went to the ER recently (for Poison Ivy), and the doctor said, “You don’t really seem like someone with the Crohn’s personality.” ????? huh??????? is the UC/IBD personality something doctors talk about behind our backs? I’d love to hear others’ experience about this!

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I have a recent article from this week to post, also, about the multitude of bacteria that lives in the gut, and it is posted here—VERY interesting! I suffered from giardia when I swam in a river that was polluted with animal feces (not fun! and I had no idea…), which caused me to experience my first severe flare-ups of Crohn’s-Colitis, back in the 1990s . . .

The article is from a cool blog, called Gizmodo, that my son, Sam, found (thanks to my family and friends for always thinking of me, and forwarding me breaking news!), and I think it shows the link between gut fungus to IBD! Hooray, the scientists are getting going on a new frontier.

LINK: http://gizmodo.com/5916813/the-weird-fungus-that-lives-in-your-gut

And, I firmly belielve that the gut has a “mind of its own.” (Read The Second Brain, by Dr. Gershon.)  Dr. Gershon is chairman of the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City and is a pioneer in research related to the gut/ brain relationship. In his book, he presents a combination of neuroscience and gastroenterology that I find fascinating. Dr, Gershon has devoted thirty years of research to this “brain in our bowel” science, and his writing is persuasive and passionate. In contemplating the body’s balance and harmony, one is struck by the simple connection between the brain in our head and the brain in our bowel.

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I’ve often wondered where expressions like “I feel it in my gut,” or the ubiquitous “butterflies in my stomach,” came from. As a layperson, writer, and Crohn’s disease patient, I am fascinated by the connection between the brain and gut.

Fungi Image by Iliyan Iliev.

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